Select Page

The Dean’s Lecture Series
Past Events
#UMTalkSmart

May 14, 2019

Smart Transportation: Travelling into the Future and Picking up Steam

On May 14, we gathered in the Carol Shields Auditorium of the Millennium Library for this Dean’s Lecture Series 2018-2019 event. It was an opportunity to talk transportation, and consider create and modern approaches to transport our city into the future.

Speaker Highlights

Jonathan Foord, City of Winnipeg’s Acting Traffic Signal and TMC Branch Head, says, “Ultimately, transportation affects people’s lives. We can do better and we should.”

Barry Prentice, professor at the Asper School of Business at U of M, and a member of the Transport Institute, says, “The technology exists. The costs are a burden… We can get a better system. We are on the road to that.”

Joseph Kornelsen, chair and founding member of Functional Transit Winnipeg, says a frequent service network would help transit to better meet people’s needs. “We want buses to arrive often, near where we want to go, and be affordable in terms of our time and other methods of transportation.”

Mark Cohoe, Executive Director of Bike Winnipeg, says “If we provide the network for people, many will choose to ride bikes.”

April 2, 2019

Opioid & Crystal Meth Addiction: How to Tackle the Problem

On April 2, there was standing room only in the Carol Shields Auditorium of the Millennium Library for this The Dean’s Lecture Series 2018-2019 event.  Opioid & Crystal Meth Addiction was an opportunity to look at how to tackle this important problem. Together, we considered possible solutions to reduce the harm to our people, and move our community forward.

Speaker Highlights

Dr. Marcia Anderson, executive director of Indigenous Academic Affairs in the Ongomiizwin Indigenous Institute of Health and Healing at Rady Faculty of Health Sciences at the U of M, says “We need to be willing to address addiction as an illness. We are still less willing to recognize the people, who need the support of public services… There is an arbitrary moral distinction between white wine and meth. But really, there are only happy and unhappy relationships with substances.”

Dawn Lavand, Manitoba Harm Reduction Network, says “If you are comfortable enough with your personal needs being met and you can start complaining about the things around you, that’s pretty awesome. You should be thankful.”

Shohan Illsley, Executive Director. Manitoba Harm Reduction Network, says “People with substance abuse deserve the highest quality health care in Canada. Not just needles. They need a safe drug supply, like walking into the liquor store and knowing what you are getting.”

Rick Lees, Executive Director, Main Street Project, says what we have learned about HIV could be applied to drug addiction. Today, people with HIV have taken control of their lives. “It’s about us, about our treatment… People need to feel valued and included in their care. So they do it for themselves and for others. We need to value the person.”

Oct. 23, 2018

Education for Social Justice

On April 2, an enthusiastic crowd of nearly 100 people gathered in the Carol Shields Auditorium of the Millennium Library for this The Dean’s Lecture Series 2018-2019 event.  Opioid & Crystal Meth Addiction was an opportunity to look at how to tackle this important problem. Together, we considered possible solutions to reduce the harm to our people, and move our community forward.

Speaker Highlights

Niigaan Sinclair, professor, Native Studies, U of M, says education should help students answer four important questions: Who am I? Why am I here? Where am I going? Who can help me?

Social justice is about speaking truth, says Sinclair. “We can’t learn how to be a human being without talking about power. We need a critical analysis of power.”

Dorota Blumczynska, executive director of the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization of Manitoba (IRCOM) addressed the immigrant experience.

“People come here with a hope to make things better, to live a different life, to place themselves in education and the curriculum. There is a need to feel complete,” says Blumcynska.

Jordan Bighorn, CEDA Pathways to Education program manager, spoke about what it means to be a true human being, as a Lakota person and also as a global citizen.

“Someone might ask why they should read something that has nothing to do with their life, but we are trying to introduce higher aspirations, to encourage people to develop a sense of accomplishment,” says Bighorn.

May 2, 2018

Winnipeg: Smart City – Intelligent Community
The launch of the Dean’s Lecture Series

On May 2, a crowd of about 30 enthusiastic people gathered at Forth for the first session of the Dean’s Lecture Series. This event was a chance to start, and continue, the conversation about how we will make our community not only Smart with its adaptation of technology, but also Intelligent in using that technology to improve people’s lives.

Speaker Highlights

Greg Dandewich, Senior Vice President, Economic Development Winnipeg, told us Smart Cities must have broadband, a knowledge workforce, innovation, digital inclusion, sustainability, advocacy and marketing. He noted that the Intelligent Community Forum, a think-tank in New York, has named Winnipeg as one of its top seven Intelligent Cities several times in the past few years.
“It’s not about the big and shiny. It’s about the successful use of innovation and technology, to make life better for our citizens. The City of Winnipeg’s proposal is a great one.”

Kathy Knight, CEO Information Communication Technology Association of Manitoba (ICTAM), said digital fluency will be required in an Intelligent city. “A higher level of education will be required, but not everyone has to be a coder.”

Gary Hepburn, Dean, Extended Education, U of M, noted that “Everyone will need to invest in lifelong learning. Our education system will have to adapt as new needs are identified. We must respond to needs of adults. For them, life must go on around education.”

Stefi Baum, Dean, Faculty of Science, U of M, said, “Building intelligent communities is ultimately about lowering the barriers between university, community, government, and industry. It involves some risk and letting go, with much to be gained.”

Learn about our upcoming events. Visit Dean’s Lecture Series.

Be among the first to know when the next session will be held, and what comes next.

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
Subscribe
and get the latest updates
ErrorHere